In Running Tips

Tying your shoes

What if you could run up to 2-4% faster without any additional training or energy for longer races such as the marathon.

Most runners tie their running shoes in the same manner they were taught as a child. This practice is fine for normal footwear, but tying running shoes the same as street shoes will contribute to early fatigue, thereby adversely affecting your time. This is because the normal method of tying shoes partially restricts the blood flow.

To illustrate the point, take a look at the back of your hand. You may be able to see the blue veins. Those are the veins that carry de-oxygenated blood from your hands, back to your lungs for a fresh supply of oxygen. Your feet are built in the same fashion. Common practice is to tie the shoe nice and tight, so the shoe will not slip around. Unfortunately, this puts pressure …

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In Running Tips

Racing a marathon. (4 phases)

There are four phases to the marathon.

Each one is distinct, and the approach you take to each will determine how you fare and how you feel in the final miles.

Phase oneā€¦The Start.

Before the race, many people are worried about the last miles of the race and how they will fare. The reality is one does not have much control in the later stages of a marathon. Every marathon is different, and nobody never knows when the race will transition to feeling uncomfortable to just plain misery.

The body sometimes is either running out of fuel, or the muscles are compromised. Often both are occurring at the same time. The fact is during this time all you can do is keep your body moving forward. Instead of the final miles, which you have no control of at this point, the concern should be focused on the first …

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In Running Tips

The Decline of American Running

This is a reprint from my first blog.

2012 vs 1975, or why are today’s runners so much slower?

The first running boom started in the mid-70s. Bill Rodgers, Frank Shorter, and others introduced Long Distance running to the masses. That running boom is a blip on the radar to what we see today. Races these days may have 10 to 20 times the number of participants compared to 40 plus years ago.

With all the technology in shoes, diet, and training, one would think we should see improvement in our collective overall times. Shockingly nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, just the opposite is occurring

In Jan 1975, I ran the Mission Bay marathon 3 hours and 3 minutes as a 16-year-old. I didn’t think it was anything remarkable at the time as I had a good portion of the runners ahead of me.

With today’s …

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